“FOMO=FUP” or How Warren Buffett Taught Me to Take Money From The Market

Is there a better business in the world than the insurance business? Not if you ask Warren Buffett. While he fools you with his aw shucks friendly grandfather routine, the man actually makes all his real money not on his investment acumen (which is extraordinary of course) but on his ability to lever the massive daily cashflow that he receives from his insurance operations.

The other day in our trading room I blurted out that real traders learn how to take money rather than make money from the market. The more I think about it the more I am convinced that it is probably the smartest thing I said.

Is there a better business in the world than the insurance business? Not if you ask Warren Buffett. While he fools you with his aw shucks friendly grandfather routine, the man actually makes all his real money not on his investment acumen (which is extraordinary of course) but on his ability to lever the massive daily cashflow that he receives from his insurance operations.

The other day in our trading room I blurted out that real traders learn how to take money rather than make money from the market. The more I think about it the more I am convinced that it is probably the smartest thing I said.

Allow me to explain.

Let’s go back to insurance. The insurance business is the only business model based on the idea of taking your money first while making a murky promise of delivering a payout sometime later. In fact, in a perfect scenario the insurance company would love to collect money from you in perpetuity and never pay you out a dime.

I am always amused at the fact that people find interactions with the insurance companies to be so confrontational. Of course they don’t want to pay you! In all other businesses they need to deliver the goods before they get your money. That’s why they are so nice to you. In insurance, they already have your money, so everything else that follows is pure annoyance and cost for them.

But setting the ethics of the business aside, the financial rewards of running an insurance company can be enormous IF you price the risk correctly. And this is where Warren Buffett comes in. If you read anything about Mr. Buffett’s insurance operations he is the farthest thing from being a low cost provider. In short, Mr. Buffett never cuts his premiums to attract more business. Indeed if you follow all his recent market deals be they insurance or not -- the primary principle by which he operates is get paid first, worry about making money on the investment later. Preferred stock anyone?

But back to the insurance business. There are basically two components to making it wildly profitable -- take the money in and make sure you give as little of it back as possible. (Buffett’s Rule #1 of investing -- Don’t lose money. Rule #2 -- see Rule #1) By assiduously focusing on both sides of the equation Buffett has learned how to take money from the market rather than just make it.

What does that mean for us as traders? It means that under no circumstance ever, do you chase business. You let the business come to you, on your terms or no terms at all. Over the past week or so I have been extraordinarily selective in picking out VT levels for us to trade. The net result is that of course we made far fewer trades, but those trades were all winners and we wound up the week up about 1% with no drawdown whatsoever.

Its not glamorous. It’s not sexy. It’s hard to sit on your hands and deny yourself the lower quality trades even as you watch them go to profit. But it undeniably works. We have a saying in the room -- “FOMO=F*up” ( i.e. Fear of Missing Out will kill you in the end).

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I think Mr. Buffett will agree with the spirit if not the tone of that message as his lesson of taking money from the market rather than making money from the market reverberates with all us in the BK trading room.

Boris Schlossberg

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